A walk in springtime.

Sunday was a gorgeous day here, sunny and warm with a tiny breeze.  I knitted in the porch for the first time this year, even had the window open.

But before that I went for a short walk. Luckily, I had my camera along.

The round-lobed hepatica are in full bloom. Meet my latest wallpaper:

Hepatica 

These little pretties are the first wildflower to bloom in the spring here, usually before anything else is green on the forest floor. They vary from white through lavender to nearly purple. I saw tons of them yesterday.

I didn't investigate this yellow flower — it was off the road and up a hill (yay for 6x zoom and cropping!) but it looks to me like a yellow violet.

Yellow

The odd thing is that the wild yellow violets do not bloom until after the wild purple violets, and those generally bloom in early June. They have barely shown their leaves yet. Further investigation is needed, as much as I dislike walking over rough ground.

Some kind of club moss, I think:

Clubmoss 

Partridge berries and more hepaticas:

Partridge berry 

Partridge berry is a low-growing ground cover whose red berries persist over the winter. They are edible but not palatable to humans (I tested this myself). The hill behind the house used to be covered with mats of partridge berry and club moss, but we lost most of it when we had to put in the new septic tank and drain field. :( 

All of that is a far cry from this, found last January somewhere on a bike forum:

Minnesota 

That is not my boy but easily could be — he has the face mask and helmet and headlamp and has biked over that bridge in Minneapolis many times.

I think I prefer the wildflowers of spring…

* * * * *

Perhaps you are curious as to what I was knitting on the porch? It was a potholder to be felted and added to the stash of stuff for sale at the Friends of the Polk County Libraries booth at local festivals this summer.

Potholder artsy 

You get the artsy shot because there are all sorts of wonky stitches and ends not fully woven in (you can see one of the ends in the photo). Given that it will be felted I didn't worry about such details.

As you can see this uses the log cabin pattern; after the initial square of 10 garter ridges, work 5 ridges, bind off, pick up stitches along the next edge, rinse and repeat. Simple, eh? I am ashamed to tell you it took me four (4!) tries to get it right. Actually reading the pattern instead of just skimming it made the difference.

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0 Responses to A walk in springtime.

  1. Chris says:

    So glad that spring seems to actually be here… I like the colors of that log cabin.

  2. Angie says:

    Love the Spring wildstuff photos! Beauties.

  3. Jeanne says:

    Wasn’t this weekend glorious! Unfortunately I worked too hard in my garden and am feeling the effects today.

  4. Erika says:

    Nice pics! I’m curious to see how that felted potholder turns out!

  5. Kym says:

    Love the hepatica. Love.

  6. soxanne says:

    Isn’t springtime grand! I spotted some hyacinth yesterday that were spectacular colors. I, however, was not carrying my camera; silly me.
    Don’t you love how forgiving felted things are? Not forgiving enough to skip reading the pattern though, apparently 😉

  7. Jocelyn says:

    I love felted stuff and maintain that face-maskian moments are exactly what results in such deep appreciation of the first glimmers of spring.

  8. gayle says:

    We’ll have flowers soon, too. Once this nasty white stuff stops dropping out of the sky…

  9. mary lou says:

    Those hepatica are lovely. I have some trillium and bloodroot blooming at least a month ahead of schedule in my yard.

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